K-9 Unit

The Jonesboro Police Department K-9 Unit is made up of seven teams and is supervised by Sgt. Larry Rogers.  Each team consists of a handler and K-9.  Six of the teams are trained in narcotics detection and patrol work, to include aggression and tracking and are responsible for assisting patrol units when requested.  We also have one team trained in explosives detection and patrol work.  Each team must participate in at least sixteen hours of formal training per month and are certified on a yearly basis.

The handlers and their dogs also enjoy doing public demonstrations.  If you are interested in a team coming to your school, meeting or event, please fill out the contact form below and you will be contacted by a member of the unit to schedule the demonstration.

K-9 FAQ’s

Yes, each handler is responsible for the care and well-being of their four-legged partner on and off duty so after each shift, the dog goes home with its handler. The City of Joneesboro provides high quality dog food and excellent medical care for each of the dogs during their career with the PD. The handler is expected to provide a comfortable living environment for the dog and ensure that the K-9 is well kept.
Our police dogs are continually training throughout their careers. To be put on the street, the dogs and their handlers have to prove their abilities during a certification test. To prepare for this, the dogs are trained for the different jobs they will perform at work. Then, the handler and K-9 train together and eventually they take the certification test. Upon successful certification, the dogs and handlers are deployed as a team. They are required to undergo, at the very least, 16 training hours per month.
The Jonesboro Police Department chooses police dogs that are sociable and friendly under normal circumstances. Each of our dogs are dual-purpose K-9’s, meaning that they do odor detection and patrol work. When commanded to by their handler, the dogs may bite a suspect. This is only done when absolutely necessary and permitted by law. The handlers and this department would much prefer that suspects comply with officers’ orders but, if the dogs are needed to take a suspect into custody, they and their handlers are trained and certified to be able to do so. You should never pet or play with any dog without the permission of the dog’s handler. However, our police dogs are very safe to be around and love to show off for groups of kids and adults alike.
The dogs get to work as long as they feel up to the job. A K-9 handler, over the course of working with the same dog for many years, learns to spot signs that the dog is slowing down or not physically up to the demands of the job any longer. When that time comes, the dog gets to enjoy retirement. The handler has the option of keeping the dog during its retirement or finding a suitable home for the K-9.
The cost varies depending on the level of training the dog has undergone prior to its purchase. JPD only buys dogs that are already trained in the basic aspects of the job. For a fully trained dog such as this, the cost is around $7500.
Just like a police officer, for a police dog to be successful, the dog must have certain personality traits and characteristics. Dog trainers will test dogs prior to choosing them for training to determine if they will make good police dogs or not. The breed of the dog does not determine how good of a police dog it will be. However, JPD generally purchases belgian malinois or german shepherds as police dogs, but only after the dog has proven that it will be able to carry out its duties as a police K-9.

Arkansas has a law making it illegal to hurt or kill any animal owned or used by a law enforcement agency. The person could be charged with a felony for doing so. It is a misdemeanor for any person to interfere with or obstruct an animal owned or used by a law enforcement agency.

5-54-126. Killing or injuring animals used by law enforcement or search and rescue dogs.

(a) Any person who:

(1) Purposely kills or physically injures;

(2) Purposely causes physical contact that is of a nature likely to cause physical injury to; or

(3) Attempts to cause physical contact that is of a nature likely to cause physical injury to any animal owned by or used by a law enforcement agency or any search and rescue dog upon conviction is guilty of a Class D felony.

(b) A person who purposely interferes with or obstructs an animal owned by or used by a law enforcement agency or a search and rescue dog used by a law enforcement officer in the discharge or attempted discharge of his or her duties upon conviction is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.

JPD K-9 Teams

Sgt. Larry Rogers
Sgt. Larry RogersK-9 Unit Supervisor
Blake Bristow
Blake BristowLead K-9 Trainer
PFC Heath Loggains and K-9 Cash
PFC Heath Loggains and K-9 Cash
PFC Erik Johnson and K-9 Gabo
PFC Erik Johnson and K-9 Gabo
PFC Dustin Smith and K-9 Rico
PFC Dustin Smith and K-9 Rico
Ptl. Jason Myers and K-9 Rocket
Ptl. Austin Morgan and K-9 Argus
Ptl. Austin Morgan and K-9 Argus
Ptl. Ethan Sanderlin and K-9 Loki
Ptl. Pete Lochner and K-9 Cygan
Ptl. Pete Lochner and K-9 Cygan